Dear Colleagues,

 

The greatest achievements of man came by, because he dared - to dream, to explore and to risk it all - without even once fearing failure. Here's one man whose dream went on to influence the ambitions of a nation of billions and became the catalyst in its story of development. The man was Mr. Jamsetji Nusserwanji Tata.

 

Jamsetji's extra-ordinary vision in his lifetime helped create many firsts for India – first among them being the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore, from where some of the brightest minds in the country have emerged. His other significant contributions include the setting up of steel plant in Jamshedpur, the pioneering hydro-electric project in Mumbai region and setting up of magnificent Taj Mahal hotel in Mumbai.

 

Today as Tata Power achieves its 100 year of operations, I don't see a more fitting time to write an ode to the man whose powerful vision made it all happen. It isn't for nothing that Jamsetji is regarded a visionary, for even in his day, his ideas were way ahead of time.

 

Jamsetji had rightly listed power among the other sectors (education, steel and hotels being the others), whose success he believed, had a bearing on the success of the nation. There's no denying that these are among the key ingredients that go into the making of a great nation. And such was his vision that at a time Bombay-based industries were being powered by coal-fired boilers, Jamsetji dreamt of supplying them clean power. He succeeded of course, and freed a choking city.

 

Another feather in the Company's illustrious cap is that its birth and subsequent success became the catalyst for the birth of many Tata companies, like Tata Projects, Tata Power Solar and TCE, to name a few. An interesting section in the history of Tata Power has been dedicated to the innovative approach to resource management – bartering with cotton for procurement of electrical equipment in the pre Independence era. That aside, Tata Power has also played a major role in institutionalizing sports like hockey and cricket in the country.

 

Even with the changing times, Tata Power has stood true to the ideals of its founder and has maintained the 'Tata culture' - the true pride of every Tata employee.

 

It is indeed a proud moment and I urge each and every employee of this 100-year-old institution to make it a glorious one.

 

Regards,
C.P. Mistry